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Debate Question

Do you think a student should have a right to choose if he or she wants to study the theory of evolution of humanity at school? Or do they have to!?

I think students should be allowed to chose if they want to study evolution.
1. It's not a law
2. Some might be uncomfortable about his topic
I personally dom't believe in evolution of humanity, and I have no desire to learn anything about it!
What do you think?
DON'T POST RUDE QUESTIONS!
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Gravity is a theory as well. But are you willing to jump off a building, stating "IT'S JUST A THEOR!!" ? I hope not. There is proof of evolution and it's in a whale. A whale has so called redumentary bones; hip bones. But as you know, a whale doesn't have legs. So the only explanation for those hip bones is that they used to be land animals. AKA evolution
Chaann94 posted over a year ago
 viktoriya773 posted over a year ago
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Debate  best answer

ThePrincesTale said:
Of course it should. It's really this simple: Evolution is part of science, and science is a requirement.

So just because it's not in your belief system, you can't even know about it? That's the most ridiculously close-minded thing I have ever heard- you're just choosing to be ignorant, choosing only to know what suits you.

And by the way, evolution is indeed at theory, but then, all science is. The comparison of teaching religion to teaching evolution is completely misguided- the two are incomparable.

To me, this whole argument is utterly disgusting. It makes bile rise in my throat to see people so obstinately convinced in the superiority of their own beliefs that they can't bear to know another.

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posted over a year ago 
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Amen(votes best)
Chaann94 posted over a year ago
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^agreed
Dewheart posted over a year ago
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Lol @ chaann
ThePrincesTale posted over a year ago
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Answers

bri-marie said:
This was already asked here.

I'll just copy and paste my answer: Much like the theory of gravity, evolution is something that we see everyday. It's been something that has been proven to exist.

I don't think you should be able to opt out of learning the facts because you don't think that's where humans came from.


EDIT: I'd like to point out that just because something is a "theory" doesn't mean it's not a fact. Theory means something different in scientific terms than it doesn't in every day vernacular. So does the word "law", for that matter.
definition of scientific theory
definition of scientific law

EDIT 2: The theory of evolution states that modern organisms are descendants of ancient organisms and that modifications accumulated over time explain the apparent changes and differences among modern forms of life.
what the theory of evolution actually says
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posted over a year ago 
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That's the point! We don't know if it's fact! And I'm talking about HUMANITY! That we evolved from monkeys!
viktoriya773 posted over a year ago
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We know it's a fact. It's been proven to happen, therefore, it's a fact. Also, we didn't evolve from monkeys.
bri-marie posted over a year ago
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Para-scence has a point. Once, the world was said to have purely inhabited by various kind of bacterium and other micro-organisms.
blackpanther666 posted over a year ago
misanthrope86 said:
If you choose to use inventions like the computer and the internet in order to communicate, then you should have no problem learning about evolution.

Do you have any issues about learning any other part of the science curriculum?

No, evolution isn't law. But going to school is (well, it is in my country) and at school you learn science, and evolution is a scientific theory that has been supported, and continues to be supported, by empirical scientific evidence.

I had no desire to learn maths. I hated maths. Maths was evil and made my brain hurt. I didn't believe in maths. But I still had to learn it.

You let kids pick what they want to learn, they'll pick ice cream and tv.
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posted over a year ago 
whiteflame55 said:
Alright, I've got a few responses for you:

1) No amount of learning is a law. It's a standard with regards to school systems that they learn a certain amount of math, English, the sciences, and any number of other subjects. No one is legally required to learn them. By that standard, no school should require students to learn anything.

2. Uncomfortability is not a good standard either. Many people are uncomfortable learning mathematics. That doesn't mean they can opt out of it.

3. The general perspective you're applying here is that you dislike it, you don't believe in it, so why should you have to learn it? The answer is that it's the most reasonable theory available. Science is all about theory. There are very few "laws," and even those are considered theory. The so-called "law of gravity" is still referred to as a theory, not because there's a lack of evidence, but because scientific sources always like to leave the option open to change the theory. It is theoretically possible that we'll find a location on this planet with abnormal gravity. It is also possible gravity doesn't actually exist - we've never found a particle that produces gravity, unlike pretty much every other force in the universe. We're still confused by the way gravity functions in many instances. Should we stop teaching it due to those uncertainties? No. Should we allow people to opt out because they disagree with it? No.

4. In the end, most of what your argument equates to is whining. You dislike the subject because it doesn't fit with your worldview, most likely the result of a religious background. You can believe what you will, no teacher can force you to accept the theory of evolution, but that doesn't mean you or anyone else can opt out of learning it. If we went by your logic, anyone who feels uncomfortable about any topic can opt out of it. That erases the whole point of school, which functions to keep people at or above a certain standard of education. There's no point to that if we go by your standards.
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posted over a year ago 
Twilight_Dream said:
Absolutely. Much like how if someone isn't Christian, they aren't forced to take part in the services and Christian teaches at a Christian school. (I know of many people who didn't have to even though they went to a Christian or Catholic school)

So I don't believe it should be any different the other way around.
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posted over a year ago 
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But school isn't a religion. Neither is science.
cassie-1-2-3 posted over a year ago
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Maybe those "gaps" of yours were the times where you went on and on about how you didn't want to be there and you just didn't pay attention. Also science DID take us back to the origin of life; collision of anti matter that created ions which created molecules which created elements and so on.
Chaann94 posted over a year ago
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Everybody has a point here, but you all seem to just go at each other's throats, instead of calmly trying to understand each other. A great part of debate is understanding what the other person is trying to say. You guys are getting confused, because you keep comparing the church to school. What is up with that? Religion is only taught at 'religious' schools and is only a necessity there... Evolution is merely a part of biology and is taught at any school that teaches science. However, I have to say that you are all going a little too deep. While we understand certain parts of evolution, whether it is from natural selection, speciation, genetic diversity and such, we still know little about it and cannot call it fact until we do so.
blackpanther666 posted over a year ago
cassie-1-2-3 said:
No.

I think that's just being stubborn and refusing to even acknowledge the fact that different ideas exist. That's a bit like refusing to learn about the Franco-Perrusian war necause you're not German or French. (But different because evolution effects all of humanity)
Or refusing to know what Hannukah is because you're Christian.

1. Math isn't a law either. Neither is Literature or spelling.
2. I feel uncomfortable learning about the digestive system. I think it's disgusting, but that's not a good enough reason to be excused from the lesson.
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posted over a year ago 
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Thinking that something is disgusting is totally different then not believing in something! I bet there are students like me, who don't have any desire to learn about evolution! If your not forced to learn Religion, I should not be forced to learn evolution!
viktoriya773 posted over a year ago
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And thank you, Cassie-1-2-3. It's good to know that I, along with a few others, am not the only one who feels this way.
DarkCEpitome posted over a year ago
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How did this turn from a discussion about Evolution, to an argument about being rude/snappish? I mean, seriously. Firstly, to the people who said evolution is more than just a theory - it is NOT, because everything humans have considered and calculated over the last thousand or so years are simply pieces of infromation that we discerned through careful thinking and research. Nothing is really more than a theory, because we really know nothing in this universe for sure and we can't say that we do. Secondly, if people want to not learn evolution, then fine, whatever... That's their problem. Thirdly, evolution is not a stand-alone, it is a part of biology and shouldn't be taught, unless it is 'within' biology, rather than as a broad topic like science... I mean, evolution is not a religion, it is a theory of how we humans can to be... It should simply be taught briefly in biology, or science (as long as it is brief), but it shouldn't be taught in science if the topic is going to be broken down and studied more closely. Anyway, that was a weird argument. I'm glad I wasn't a part of it. XD
blackpanther666 posted over a year ago
Dewheart said:
But then were would the line be drawn? Could students opt out of studying math or English?

There are certain requirements for education, and one of them is to teach what is scientific fact.

Evolution is scientific fact.

Therefore it is should be required. People can't pick and choose what they want to learn and then graduate with their classmates without having completed the curriculum. We need more educated people in America not less.

Besides, if you disagree with something what's wrong with learning more about it? Being informed is always good. I often read opposing arguments to see if the other side has any good points and in order to debate you must have a good understanding of the topic you are debating. How can you say you don't believe something if you don't understand it and don't care too?

And really, you learn little in high school about evolution as it is. So if you don't want to study it in detail, then don't major in biology in college. Simple.

It doesn't really matter whether people are uncomfortable about evolution. It's accepted by the vast majority of scientists who have studied it and actually know what they are talking about, and it would be dishonest and quite frankly unethical to not include modern scientific knowledge in the schools curriculum.
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posted over a year ago 
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Look! Don't you get it!!!? I do not care about evolution!!!!!!!! I do not want to lean it! I was forced to learn it! And I hate it! The more I learned, some thongs got more clear to me! But mostly it made me realize the huge gaps it has! The more I learn the more I son't believe in it! You are not forced to study religion! I should be not forced to study evolution! Modern science or not! Not all accept it! It's NOT a law!
viktoriya773 posted over a year ago
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Actually I was forced to study religion. I attended catholic school from the age of three all the way up to fourteen. Also there is a huge difference between science and religion. Religion belongs in a church and science belongs in a classroom. Religion consists of beliefs while science consists of theories and hypothesis's supported by evidence. And if you don't want to learn it then that's tough. Because it's a fact and it's part of the school's curriculum.
Dewheart posted over a year ago
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School teaches you about science right? Then you should learn about Evolution as well. School is supposed to educate you, not tell you how great your personal ideals are.
Chaann94 posted over a year ago
alismouha said:
1.Evolution is a fact accepted by the vast majority of modern biologists.

2.So what? People can feel uncomfortable about a lot of things they learn at school. We can't allow anyone to not learn about something just because they don't like it.
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posted over a year ago 
DarkCEpitome said:
I personally don't see why. I'm Christian myself, although I don't have a problem with learning about evolution. I guess you can say I'm open towards both Adam and Eve and evolution being the story as to how the world began. Partly because I believe that either way, God had something to do with it.


As for learning evolution in schools;

Although I myself don't mind learning about it, I can understand why others wouldn't. It's not so much that they don't want to be open-minded towards other ideas, as some people here have put it. It's the fact that they, like others will surely do on this webpage, want to stand by their beliefs and not be feed information that they see, as some people here may see religion, as utter bullshit.

And I can honestly understand that perspective.

And really, if not wanting to learn about evolution throughout high school is a narrow-minded action and poor choice, who is it really impacting other than the person who chose not to take the damn class? -_-
As much as any plausible ignorance irritates me, it's only (as some people see it) damaging the person who chose not to learn about the damn evolution theory. Not much of anyone else.


That's just my opinion.
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posted over a year ago 
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*why not...in first sentence...
DarkCEpitome posted over a year ago
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I'm actually going to have to disagree that the people who refuse to learn about religion are only hurting themselves. These people are, eventually, going to reach a point where they are going to be deciding their children's curriculum (or the curriculum of other students, depending), or laws regarding these issues. And their going to vote to keep it away, simply because it goes against their beliefs, even though they know absoulutely nothing about it (as they've proven time and time again). I'd also like to point out that they (rarely) don't stop at just education. Usually people who are against learning evolution tend to be against learning other things as well. (Sex education, for example), which, again, has been proven to have consequences for others. (High teen pregency rate).
bri-marie posted over a year ago
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I understand why you've been irked by other's responses (on both sides). I've been as well, which is why I've kept my distance on those ones.
bri-marie posted over a year ago
dreamfields said:
Ok, I don't believe in most of evolution. It has not been proven to be fact. The fact is, that people have been told evolution is a proven fact enough time to cause them to believe it.
I think that there are so many things that would be impossible to happen by pure chance of evolution. My suggestion would be to offer an elective course in the Theory of Intellegent Design. Let the students decide on the basis of what both theories have to offer.
If anyone is interested, you can google the dvd, "No Intellegence Allowed". You can watch it online. It gives an explanation of Intellegent Design, and explains why some Science Proffesionals and Profressors have been censored for believing it.
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posted over a year ago 
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I'm sorry. That is simply not true. Evolution is accepted as fact by most biologists while intelligent design is regarded as pseudoscience by the scientific community at large. Furthermore, "No intelligence allowed" is filled with fallacious argumentation, dishonest presentation, and misinformation.
alismouha posted over a year ago
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I respect you opinion, but stand by mine. The reason I like this site is we can discuss ideology without personal attacks.
dreamfields posted over a year ago
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Well, if you don't see the general consensus of scientists as a valid source for what should be taught in school, what do you think is?
alismouha posted over a year ago
blackpanther666 said:
If people get the choice to not have to learn about religion at schools, then I don't see why religious people should have to learn something that can counter-act what they believe in in some ways, so to speak. Yes, I understand that evolution has been proven in a few ways, but there are also pieces of evolution that have not been proven. Plus, I took biology at university, so I personally believe in many of the theories that biologists have proposed, yet I still can look at this issue from both sides. You see, I don't think people should be 'forced' to learn anything, I think everyone should get the choice in what they want to learn, because science, maths and english are not the only important subjects out there. Plus, Science and maths are only important for some careers, not everyone is going to want to be a physicist, or biologist. If people want to miss out some topics that others see as important, well, that is THEIR choice, even if others see it as dumb, it is still their choice. How would you like it if your teacher said: 'We are taking out science, so that you no longer have the choice.' How would that make you feel?
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posted over a year ago 
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Oh, by the way, the only subject that everybody should have to learn is English. It is more important than anything else, because it promotes communication.
blackpanther666 posted over a year ago
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I'm "forced" to learn maths as well. I'm starting to agree with my literature teacher about the fact that students these days are spoiled. As if they get to choose what they want to learn =S If it'd be my choice to study maths or economics, i wouldn't.
Chaann94 posted over a year ago
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I can't help but disagree, BP. English is certainly important, but people should have to learn basic math, at the very least up to basic algebra. I think it's necessary to learn some of the sciences too, if only to learn what experimental method looks like. Both math and science are incredibly important for logical inference, something everyone needs to have. History's a necessary subject for good reason as well - if you don't know where you're coming from, you can't know where you're going.
whiteflame55 posted over a year ago
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Maybe so, Whiteflame, but those aren't really 'necessities'... People can get by, even without history, or basic maths, but if you can't communicate, then you are seriously screwed.
blackpanther666 posted over a year ago
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