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Article by Helije posted over a year ago
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Bust of Hades. Marble, Roman copy after a Greek original from the 5th century BCE; the black mantle is a modern addition.
In Greek mythology, Hades (the "unseen"), the god of the underworld, was a son of the Titans, Cronus and Rhea. He had three sisters, Demeter, Hestia, and Hera, as well as two brothers, Zeus, the youngest of the three, and Poseidon, collectively comprising the original six Olympian gods. Upon reaching adulthood, Zeus managed to force his father to disgorge his siblings. After their release the six younger gods, along with allies they managed to gather, challenged the elder gods for power in the Titanomachy, a divine war. Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades received weapons from the three Cyclopes to help in the war: Zeus the thunderbolt, Hades the Helm of Darkness, and Poseidon the trident. The night before the first battle, Hades put on his helmet and, being invisible, slipped over to the Titans' camp and destroyed their weapons. The war lasted for ten years and ended with the victory of the younger gods. Following their victory, according to a single famous passage in the Iliad (xv.187–93), Hades and his two brothers, Poseidon and Zeus, drew lots for realms to rule. Zeus got the sky, Poseidon got the seas, and Hades received the underworld, the unseen realm to which the dead go upon...
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Article by Helije posted over a year ago
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The Return of Persephone by Frederic Leighton (1891)
Unlike every other offspring of an Olympian pairing of deities, Persephone has no stable position at Olympus. Persephone used to live far away from the other deities, a goddess within Nature herself before the days of planting seeds and nurturing plants. In the Olympian telling, the gods Hermes, Ares, Apollo, and Hephaestus, had all wooed Persephone; but Demeter rejected all their gifts and hid her daughter away from the company of the Olympian deities. Thus, Persephone lived a peaceful life before she became the goddess of the underworld, which, according to Olympian mythographers, did not occur until Hades abducted her and brought her into it. She was innocently picking flowers with some nymphs, Athena, and Artemis, the Homeric hymn says, or Leucippe, or Oceanids, in a field in Enna when Hades came to abduct her, bursting through a cleft in the earth. Later, the nymphs were changed by Demeter into the Sirens for not having interfered. Life came to a standstill as the devastated Demeter, goddess of the Earth, searched everywhere for her lost daughter. Helios, the sun, who sees everything, eventually told Demeter what had happened.
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Article by Helije posted over a year ago
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Zeus darting its lightning on Typhon. Side B from a Chalcidian black-figured hydria, ca. 550 BC.
Typhon was the last child of Gaia. After the defeat of his brothers Gigantes, Gaia urged him to avenge them, as well as his other brothers, the Titans.

Typhon started destroying cities and hurling mountains in a fit of rage. In the panic fear of Typhon, the gods fled to Egypt, where, in order to hide, they turned into a variety of animals: Zeus into the ram (leader), Hera into the cow, Aphrodite into a fish, Hephaestus into the ox, Heracles into a bird ibis. Only Athena stood on Mount Olympus, and she began a rebuke of Zeus because of cowardice, untill he again took his real face. Others say that Zeus and Athena bravely greeted Typhon.

Armed with his thunderbolts and steel sickle, Zeus chased Typhon all the way to Syria. When he managed to wound him, Zeus was engaged in combat with him. However, Typhon has proved to be a worthy opponent, and although wounded, managed to take steel sickle and to cut Zeus' tendons of the hands and legs. So he captured Zeus and entrusted his tendons to the dragon Delphyne. However, Hermes and Egipan managed to steal the tendons and return it to Zeus, who again attacked Typhon. Typhon threw rocks at Zeus, but the ruler of...
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