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Guide by PrueFever posted 1 month ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Jake from "The Rescuers Down Under" (1990)

The character of the Australian Mr. Competent, Jake, has a very difficult role to perform: he must be simultaneously an adventure hero and a comical figure; moreover, he mustn't be Crocodile Dundee. This last point the animators seems to have taken very much to heart for, although Jake's persona has many of the macho, tough-guy attributes of that hero and countless other Australian stereotypes, the core of the characterization has the same sort of rapid-moving, energetic, flighty grace that one might expect from the animal on which Jake is based, the kangaroo mouse (or, more correctly, kangaroo rat). Jake's toughness stems - of necessity - from his strength of personality rather than from his physique. This must have made him an extremely interesting character for all concerned to work with, and certainly makes him enormously appealing to the audience as a pivotal contributor to the story. For, in a way analogous to his method of coping with...
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Guide by PrueFever posted 11 months ago
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The beautiful Vanessa
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Vanessa from "The Little Mermaid" (1989)

When Ursula adopts human guise in order to ensnare Eric romantically (with the aid of Ariel's hostage voice), she takes for herself the name Vanessa. Vanessa so strongly resembles Ariel that it is easier to note the differences than the similarities. Some are superficial - the hair colour, for example - and others much more fundamental. A curious feature of Vanessa is that, even though Ariel is in theory still a little uncertain on her legs, Vanessa is actually a much clumsier mover - something that is particuarly noticeable in the scene where, witnessed through the porthole by Scuttle, Vanessa climbs up on her dressing table to admire herself in the mirror. (Her reflection, of course, shows her true self: we see the gloating, malicous, adipose face of Ursula's habitual form.)
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The regal Mufasa, given life by the booming voice of James Earl Jones.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Mufasa from "The Lion King" (1994)

With his great orange mane and his powerful physique, the first of the movie's two Lion Kings, Simba's father appears much as we might expect him to, and he is voiced appropriately in the deep tones of James Earl Jones. In a way, after the initial scene where Rafiki is presenting the new cub to the massed animals, we see Mufasa only from the viewpoint of the young Simba; he is not so much large as huge, and we have the feeling that he is the ruler not just of the Pride Lands but of the world. This feeling is reinforced by a selection of dialogue in which Mufasa tries to give his young son some idea of the responsibilities of kingship:

Mufasa: Look, Simba. Everything the light touches is our kingdom,
Simba: Wow.
Mufasa: A king's time as ruler rises and falls like the sun. One day, Simba, the sun will set on my time here and will rise with you as the new king.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Baloo, the true star of "The Jungle Book".
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Baloo from "The Jungle Book" (1967)

It had been originally planned that Baloo should have no more than a cameo role, but the animators (Ollie Johnston was largely responsible for him) found Phill Harris's vocalization fascinating to work with and so in due course Baloo became one of the movie's major stars. Indeed, in terms of popularity and screen presence, he is the main star of The Jungle Book, eclipsing even Bagheera, whose role is much more fundamental to the story.
A big, blue-gray burly character, Baloo has adopted easy-goingness as the keystone of his life. According to Bagheera, who calls him a "jungle bum" and various worse names, Baloo has taken this to excess, and the panther is worried that Mowgli will follow in Baloo's path and become a disreputable pest of the jungle. The panther is probably right, but Baloo, despite his general fecklessness, proves to be a true friend to the little boy. His decisions may not always be admirable, and his friendship...
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List by OnceUponASptmbr posted over a year ago
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Since "Parks and Recreation" wrapped, I've worked on a list of Disney characters that I believe closely match our most cherished Pawnee citizens in terms of personality and (sometimes) looks.

Anna -- Leslie Knope: A bubbly go-getter whose optimism is infectious. Oh, and they both happen to love consuming large amounts of sugar+would do anything for those they love (including their ungrateful public).

John Silver -- Ronald Ulysses Swanson: This self-sufficient, intimidating gentleman is a man of self-dictated principles which are usually at odds with his surroundings. Although he doesn't believe in conformation, and does resist governmental influence as much as possible, he's nonetheless established some semblance of order and will only tolerate a certain amount of disregard for anything which disturbs that precious balance. Both anti-heroes befriend the very people meant to serve as their nemeses, and tend to offer their appreciation through actions. But the guidance they do extend is invaluable.
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Opinion by Renegade1765 posted over a year ago
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It was all started by a mouse...
Hi everyone,today I'm going to talk about the Disney characters that resemble be.
First of all,these are the Disney characters that resemble MY personality,I'm fine if you either love or dislike these characters,I just want you guys to respect my opinion.
Now,without any further ado,let's begin.
Elsa:
-I often lose my temper and snap at the ones I love,even though I'm a peace loving person,they usually force me;
-I don't really like goofing around;
-I love deeply,even though I usually act very grumpy towards my family,I still love them,and I'd be crushed if something happens to them;
-I have great eyes to detail;
-I look good in blue,though I look better in black;
-I don't smile that much,I'm usually depressed,angry and just not that smiley;
-I'm very secretive towards others;
-I have a sense of responsibility;
-I'm the ruler of my own kingdom(figuratively);
-Love chocolate(Who doesn't ?);
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Opinion by avatar_tla_fan posted over a year ago
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Sorry for reposting my articles from the DP club onto here, but is like to spread some of my Disney opinions onto other Disney related clubs. ^_^

I decided to write an article on why my favorite Disney Princess.. Is my favorite Disney Princess. Anyways, please keep in mind that this is my opinion, and we may disagree, so respect my opinion, and I will respect yours. Enjoy the article! :)

Snow White is an amazing character, in my opinion. She is my favorite Disney Princess, and is my favorite Disney Character. She is also one of my favorite animated characters, and fictional characters in general. Now, let's talk about why.


She has a mix of what I like in a character, she's sweet and kind, but she isn't a pushover. She can be a bit bossy, but doesn't overdo it, and isn't forceful at the same time. Not only is she a bit bossy, but she also has some sass in her as well. It may not be as visible as it is with some characters, but it's in her. She's polite, respects others, and doesn't let things that have happened in her life get to her.
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List by avatar_tla_fan posted over a year ago
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This is actually an article that I posted off in the Childhood Animated Movie Heroines club, but I'm going to post it here as well.


5. Cinderella

In my opinion, she is the second prettiest Disney Princess! She's a real classic beauty and I love that about her. She has gorgeous blonde hair, which I love, I find all hair colors gorgeous but black and blonde the most so. She also has absolutely beautiful eyes, lips, and though her nose is poorly drawn, I don't find her ugly in the slightest from that. I'm probably the only one who thinks this, but I think she would actually look prettier in computer animation, but that's just me, I think. Still though, I think she is definitely the second prettiest Disney Princess and one of the prettiest Disney Heroines overall. The reason why she's not higher is just because.. Well I just find the others prettier than she is.


4. Silvermist

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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The young Thumper, ready for mischief and impertinence.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Thumper from "Bambi" (1942)

Thumper, animated by Ollie Johnston; Frank Thomas and others, is probably the star of the movie. To a great extent this is because of the unconscoously brilliant voicing of the part by young Peter Behn, said to have been discovered by two of the animators when visiting a friend’s house. (David R. Smith has checked with Johnston and Thomas, who say that Behn was instead discovered at an audition. As with so many matters concerning the early Disney movies, memories differ.) The voice is cute, but not in a nauseatingly affected way; it is ingenuous and clearly that of a real child rather than of an adult pretending to be one. Of course, Disney exploited its natural cuteness to the utmost, as in the classic piece of dialogue a few weeks after Bambi’s birth:

Thumper: He doesn’t walk very good, does he?
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The handsome Gaston
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Gaston from "Beauty and the Beast" (1991)

Where the Beast is ugy on the outsider but proves to be beautiful within, Gaston is the exact reverse: his devastatingly handsome exterior conceals a vile interior. His supervising animator, Andreas Deja, has recounted how at first he had some difficulty getting to grips with this: his natural inklination was to give Gaston something more of the looks of a villain. Then it was put to him that it was crucial for the movie that Gaston be every bit as good-looking as the Beast is repulsive, and suddenly the character took life: “When I saw the first test reels, I thought, ‘God, I know such people. Los Angeles is full of them.’” But Deja was also concerned that Gaston’s external persona shouldn’t be merely a caricature of the type we all know and loathe: “I wanted Gaston to be a dimensional character that the audience would feel they could reach out and grab.” A futher inspiration was supplied to Deja by Richard White, who was Gaston’s...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Lady Tremaine, Cinderella's unspeakable stepmother.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Lady Tremaine from "Cinderella" (1950)

Although she porssesses no known magical powers, it is hard to no see Cinderella's wicked stepmother, Lady Tremaine as anything other than a witch, the counterpart of the Evil Stepmother in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs - indeed, she even has a familiar, in the shape of the cat Lucifer. Curiously, she was principally animated by Frank Thomas, much better known for his soft and sentimental scenes and characters, such as the dwarfs crying over Snow White's "dead" body, Pinocchio singing at the marionette theatre, Bambi and Thumper on the ice, Lady and the Tramp eating spaghetti and the three Fairies in Sleeping Beauty (although he also was reponsible for Hook in Peter Pan, too). Certainly she is a denizen of the evil realm, as Thomas A. Nelson points out:
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Lady was the ideal Christmas present for Darling.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Lady from "Lady and the Tramp" (1955)

The opening sequence in the movie, when Darling opens up a hatbox to discover that the gift which Jim Dear has given her for Christmas is a puppy, Lady, had its origins in an incident in Walt's own life. Many years before he had forgotten about a dinner date with his wife, and some sort of gift by way of a peace-offering was definitely called for - something really special. His solution was to give her a puppy in a hatbox. It worked: she forgave him. It was an event which Walt knew he could someday put to good use in a cartoon.
The model for Lady was a cocker spaniel called Lady which belonged to the animator Hamilton Luske. In reality, however, there are two "Ladies" in the movie - the newborn puppy and the young female dog. Both are evidently the same animal, but the older version has quite definite fremale characteristics while the puppy is, like all puppies, essentially sexless. However, the underlying character - loving, basically trusting,...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Cruella De Vil from "One Hundred and One Dalmatians" (1961)

What can you say about Cruella De Vil, probably the finest Disney villain of them all? Well, over the years, people have said quite a lot about her, most notably Marc Davis, whose screen creation she was. The reviewers and the public agreed, for once, on a Disney character. As one critic put it:

"The real triumph of the film is Cruella De Vil. She is the most sophisticated of the Disney bad guys."

She is also one of the most evil, especially since, unlike The Evil Queen in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Maleficent in Sleeping Beauty, she is very much a monster of today, unendowed with magical powers and all the other trappings of that golden past which never in fact existed. She was born from the imaginations of not only Marc Davis but also, of curse, Dodie Smith - a fact that Disney-buffs are prone to forget, although Davis himself did not:
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News by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Jodi Benson.
It's often been said that good things come to those who wait. But no one knows that axiom better than voice actor Jodi Benson. Who had to wait a full year after handing in her The Little Mermaid audition tape before Jodi then learned that she had won the role of a lifetime.

"Back in the Fall of 1986, I was appearing in Smile, a Broadway musical that Howard Ashman had written with Marvin Hamlisch. Given that Howard and Marvin were such huge talents, everyone thought that this show would run forever. But that isn't what happened with Smile. It closed at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre after just 48 performances in January of 1987," Benson recalled during a recent phone interview.

"Now at this point, Howard had just begun pre-production on The Little Mermaid at Disney. And he genuinely felt bad that Smile had closed so quickly. Which is why he then invited all of the girls from that show to come audition for Ariel," Jodi continued. "So I -- just like everybody else in Smile -- laid down my audition on an old-fashioned, reel-to-reel tape. And this tape was then sent into the powers-that-be at Disney with no names or pictures attached. They were just listening to...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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PrueFever aka Jørgen with his idol, Prue Halliwell aka Shannen Doherty.
Life has never been easy for PrueFever aka Jørgen Jørgensen (J.J. for short). When his mom started drinking alcohol a few weeks after his birth, his father did the same thing a couple of years later, which led to Social Service removing him and his sisters from home and placed them in different Foster Homes in Denmark. Then in 1997 J.J. was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome, although on the mild end of the ASD spectrum. Then in 2007 his mother died and in 2008 his father was killed. And yet, when Fanpop met up with him in Planet Hollywood in London, it was a fresh, smiling young man we met. Ordering his favorite Burger from the menu, we sat down and had a good chat about Fanpop, Disney and Life in General.

Fanpop: Hello Prue, or Jørgen as your real name is. First of all, thank you for taking time to do this Interview with us.

Jørgen: Oh no, I'm the one who should be thanking you for this interview! It's quite an hornor!

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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Thomas from "Pocahontas" (1995)

A callow youth, Thomas epitomizes the changing mood of the settlers. When we first see him he is kissing his mother goodbye on the dock in London - they may never see each other again. Within an instant, however, he is enthusiatic about the challenge of the voyage and by the prospect of serving with the great "savage" slayer John Smith. Later Smith saves his life as, during the storm at sea, Thomas very courageously attempts to save a cannon from being washed overboard. But Thomas, despite his valor, is no master of the martial arts; derided on occasion by Ratcliffe, he is nevertheless sent by him into the forest in pursuit of Smith, and it comes as a surprise - to Thomas and us when he shoots dead the murderous Kocoum, for beforehand Thomas has done nothing much with his musket except miss whatever target he has aimed at. Smith sends him back with his tail between his legs to the stockade, and for the first time, it seems, Thomas begins to realize his error...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Shanti, the human girl.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Shanti, The Girl from "The Jungle Book" (1967)

The little lass with a red spot on her forehead who comes down from the manvillage to captivate Mowgli is full of eastern promise. Although it will be a decade or so before the promise turns into anything else, she nevertheless enchants Mowgli as she fetches water from the river and sings the song "My Own Home", yet another fine piece of work from the Sherman Brothers.
She has little by way of character except her basic allure, which weaves a more powerful spell upon Mowgli than even Kaa's hypnotic attempts. Baloo advises the boy when he sees a female human for the first time: "Forget about those - they ain't nothin' but trouble!"
Mowgli, though youthful, has more sense.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Cover Art for Disney's Frozen
‘Frozen’ Bonus Features to include Deleted Scenes, Docs; Digital Edition on February 25

Posted on January 10, 2014

After confirming the release of Disney’s Frozen on March 18, 2014, Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment has now released the list of bonus features that can be found on the Blu-ray edition of the film. You can find additional information below. Frozen is currently available for pre-order from Amazon or from Disney Store, which includes a set of exclusive lithographs. As we also shared earlier, Walmart (who is expected to offer the 3D edition exclusively, but has not yet re-listed it, will be offering an exclusive version coupled with either an Anna or Elsa ‘Disney Infinity’ figure). An HD digital edition of the film will be made available earlier, on February 25.

Walt Disney Animation Studios presents a chilly twist on one of the most humorous and heartwarming stories ever told. “Disney Animation’s best since The Lion King” (William Bibbiani, CraveOnline) will melt your heart. Fearless optimist Anna sets off on an epic journey — teaming up with rugged mountain man Kristoff and his loyal reindeer...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The good-hearted Quasimodo.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Quasimodo from "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1996)

In a way, why Esmeralda should choose Phoebus as her lover rather than Quasimodo is something of a mystery. One is left with a slight puzzlement at the end of the movie, as if suddenly discovering that the romantic heroine whose adventures one has followed entranced throughout a long novel actually has a lousy taste in men. There is also a feeling of confused morality, since the primary theme of the movie - as expressed more than once in song as "who is the monster and who is the man?" - is that outward appearances are not what are important, yet Esmeralda opts for the man with the better outward appearance.
This is not to suggest, of couse, that Quasimodo is much of a looker. Quite the contrary: he is almost certainly the ugliest hero ever to have starred in an animated feature. His face is quite hideously distorted: when Esmeralda first encounters him she assumes he is wearing a deliberately grotesque mask. He has huge orange-red...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Djali from "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1996)

Esmeralda's pet goat possesses human intelligence and a fierce loyalty to his owner. When she is persecuted by the two guards in the early street sequence, it is Djali - before Phoebus intervenes - who initially almost sees them off, butting them with determined ferocity, even though he is a very small goat. He helps in other ways, most notably by assisting her in her oft-used disguise as a cowled male figure - he sits on her head with a pipe clutched between his teeth. A nice visual touch is that, just like Esmeralda, he has a large golden ring through one ear.
Like any other goat, he has an appetite for the strangest things - at one stage devouring most of the carved figurines dotted around Quasimodo's miniature model of Paris. Unlike any other goat (well, one assumes so), he is the target of the passions of a gargoyle.
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News by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Jungle Book: Diamond Edition Blu-Ray Cover
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Make Mowgli and His Jungle Family A Part of Yours When

Disney’s “Jungle Book: Diamond Edition”

Swings onto Blu-ray™, DVD and Digital on February 11, 2014

Film Synopsis:     Now for the first time ever on Blu-ray with glorious digital high definition,
Disney’s Jumpin’ Jungle Classic has never looked so lush or sounded so good! Beloved characters, swinging music and new behind-the-scenes bonus features make this Diamond Edition Blu-ray a must-have for every family’s classic collection!

Meet the most unforgettable characters and embark on a thrilling adventure with Mowgli as he journeys deep into the jungle and learns “The Bare Necessities” of life from happy-go-lucky Baloo the bear. Meet Bagheera, the wise old panther, and crazy King Louie, the orangutan. But watch out for the cunning tiger Shere Khan and Kaa, the ssssneakiest snake in the jungle!
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News by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Walt Disney Blu-Ray Cover of The Little Mermaid: Diamond Edition
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Rediscover the Film That Gave Voice to a Whole Generation

Disney’s “The Little Mermaid: Diamond Edition”

Splashes Its Ways Into Homes For The Very First Time In Blu-ray™ Hi-Def
With New Breathtaking Picture and Sound Restoration

Film Synopsis: Ariel (voiced by Jodi Benson), is a free-spirited mermaid, who is off on the adventure of a lifetime with her best friend, the adorable Flounder (voiced by Jason Marin), and the reggae-singing Caribbean crab Sebastian (voiced by Samuel E. Wright) at her side. But it will take all of her courage and determination to make her dreams come true—and save her father’s beloved kingdom from the sneaky sea witch Ursula (voiced by Pat Carroll).

Voice Talent: Jodi Benson (Toy Story 2, Toy Story 3) as Princess Ariel
Samuel E. Wright (The Lion King Broadway Show) as Sebastian
Jason Marin (Back to the Future) as Flounder
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Rajah with his best friend, the lovely Princess Jasmine.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Rajah from "Aladdin" (1992)

The characterization of Rajah is one of the most pleasing in the movie; although the role is not a major one, the effect is neatly executed. Before Jasmine makes her escape to the souk, Rajah is the only true companion she has - her father, while loving, has no comprehension of her at all. This vast tiger, cleverly animated to give the full impression not just of size but of sheer weight - his shoulders bulge and his movements are ponderous - becomes like a kitten when he is in the presence of Jasmine: she hugs him as if he were a domestic cat in her times of sorrow. Even though a real tiger would probably opt to have her for lunch, the scenes between her and Rajah are completely convincing, most likely because of the depiction of his eyes: there is an empahty there of the type we all hope for (and probably we entirely misinterpret the expression) from our own pets. This is most evident when Jasmine tells the tiger that she must explore the world...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The hero of the movie, Aladdin.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Prince Aladdin from "Aladdin" (1992)

As is very often the case in the Disney animated features, the story of Aladdin as a character is that of growth from selfunderestimation to the realization that the individual has worth and can achieve a particular aim, which is generally living happily ever after with the mate of his choice. The different here is that Aladdin tries to cheat - he makes the Genie turn him into a prince so that he can woo Jasmine, and it is a time before the Genie gets it through to him that he should simply be himself and take his chances. We know from the first that Aladdin is going to succeed - we'd hardly have gone to the movie otherwise - but the point is firmly made in the early stages when the baggy-panted street rat Aladdin, accompanied by his tiny pet monkey Abu, steals a loaf of bread (a crime) but then gives it to a couple of street waifs who are so desperately hungry that they are seaching through an anachronistic garbage can for food. The waifs are then...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Iago from "Aladdin" (1992)

Jafar's sidekick is an irascible parrot, who - unusually for the birds - has teeth, and a lot of them at that. Hilariously voiced by Gilbert Gottfried at a general level of about one hundred decibles, Iago is as malicious as his master (although his character changed for The Return of Jafar). As is customary in the animated features, he is constantly being subjected to indignities by the one he serves - at one memorable stage he is deliberately trapped by Jafar in a sliding door - yet in this instance the slave is wiser than the master, for it is Iago who has the idea that Jafar's tactic to attain the sultanate should be through marrying Jasmine.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The evil vizier, Jafar.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Jafar from "Aladdin" (1993)

The evil vizier is represented as a caricature villain - he has a long thin face, a curly black wisp of beard, two great spikes of something sticking out from shoulders of his customary garb, an unpleasant habit of hypnotizing people, a sinister voice, and very much more. However, the exaggeration works: the characterization is such that we early become fully aware of his evil, and we cheer when he gets his deserved comeuppance. Much of this is, of course, a result of his deeds: we discover that he abuses power, both political and financial. He shows no compunction at all, having discovered the Cave of Wonders and cognizant that the Magic Lamp is contained within, in sacrificing the life of the criminal Gazeem in an ill-fated attempt to steal the Lamp. He lies cruelly to Jasmine in telling her that the street rat (Aladdin) who saved her from having her hand chopped off has been beheaded for the crime of kidnapping her (an obvious miscarriage of justice);...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Sultan, ruler of Agrabah.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of The Sultan from "Aladdin" (1992)

Portly and chubby-faced, with a large turban and a small stature, the Sultan hardly conforms to one's image of the average despot, yet he is a despot toward his daughter: confined within the palace walls, she must choose a suitor of noble blood by the time she is sixteen, because that is the law. It does not occur to the Sultan until very late in the movie that, although he did not originate the law, it is within his power to change it if he wants to, and it never seems to cross his mind that it is an unjust law - a stupid and bigoted tradition. Yet it is also very clear that he loves his daughter more than anything in the world: it is simply that he cannot understand what seems to him to be her perversity, her demand for independence.
The Sultan is slow on the uptake about most things. It takes him a very long time while indeed to realize that he has unwittingly passed the rule of Agrabah over to his vizier, Jafar, who can control him...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Esmeralda, one of Disney's most sexiest heroines ever!
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Esmeralda from "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1996)

If Quasimodo is Disney's ugliest hero, Esmeralda is indubitably the company's sexiest - apart from Jessica Rabbit. Esmeralda, the gupsy dancer who performs in the street in order to earn coppers to feed herself and her pet goat Djali, has a huge mane of black hair, turquoise eyes that flash whenever her ire is roused, a risqué sense of humor, and an approach to life that is underlined by an attitude of steel. She is also clearly intelligent. It is little wonder that Quasimodo and Phoebus fall in love with her, and that Frollo finds his lust inflamed by her.
It is not immediately obvious (except to those who have read the original novel) that she is going to be the movie's central female star: we see glimpses of her as part of the Parisian cityscape, but then there are other street characters whom we see from time to time. It is only when Phoebus, returned from the wars to take up office under Frollo, first sets eyes on her that we...
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The evil Fairy, Maleficent.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Maleficent from "Sleeping Beauty" (1959)

Of all the characters in Sleeping Beauty, the one that everyone remembers, even decades later, is the wicked fairy Maleficent. She is one of the finest creations ever to come out of the Disney studio - and the brilliant transformation of her into the Dragon to fight Phillip merely adds to the strength of the characterization. Even her name - a wonderful combination of "malice" and "malevolent" - testifies to her pure evil. People who thought that the wicked Queen in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs might frighten their children were presumably petrified themselves when they took their grandchildren to see Maleficent. To an extent this is achieved because she is a much more rounded character than her earlier counterpart - she has something of the dashing style of Cruella De Vil in One Hundred and One Dalmatians - which is hardly surprising, because Marc Davis did much of the work on both of them. In his interview with A....
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Pocahontas' best friend, Nakoma.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Pocahontas's best friend, Nakoma is something of a character in search of a personality; in their pairing, Pocahontas is certainly the dominant one and certainly the brighter. Nakoma represents, in a subtler way than Kocoum, the reluctance of most of the Native Americans to embrace change, and thus contrasts completely with Pocahontas, who is a wild, free spirit enthusiastic to find adventure in each new moment. Their physical appearances reflect this: Pocahontas has a genuine Native American face and untamed hair that is almost a character in itself; Nakoma, by contrast, has an almost Asiatic face that is surrounded by neatly trimmed hair. Only once in the movie does she really let herself go - when she and Pocahontas indulge in a splashing match in the river.
Otherwise Nakoma thinks and does what is right - at least in her view, which may not be entierly consistent. She covers for Pocahontas once when the latter sneaks off for a rendezvous with Smith but is not prepared to do so a second time; this failure, of course, causes great...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The beautiful Pocahontas
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

A recurrent characteristic of the Disney animated features over the past few years - at least since 1989's The Little Mermaid - has been the presence of a strong female character in a central role. Belle, Jasmine and Esmeralda are other examples. None of these, however, can compare with the figure of Pocahontas: She is the movie, to the extent that, when everything else might be forgotten, her image persists in the memory. The reasons for this phenomenon are multiple, involving not only her conceptualization and animation (Glen Keane was the supervising animator) but also her voicing (Irene Bedard for Pocahontas speaking and Judy Kuhn for Pocahontas singing), her dialogue, her way of moving, and perhaps above all, her hair, which moves in the wind in such a way as to express a freedom no longer available to us. She is not some chic beauty thrust at us as a politically correct image of the Native American; she is exotic and beautiful and as wild as any of the animals the settlers might have come across in the New World.
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One of Walt Disney's most beloved characters, Bambi.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Bambi is not a tightly plotted movie in the way that Dumbo, for example, is: it depends much more for its effect on the superb animation and the exquisitely executed backdrop of the forest. As with the story, most of the characterization is not profound - one does not find oneself rooting for Bambi in the same way that one does for, say, Dumbo (again) or Snow White. The only really strong characterizations are those of Friend Owl and Thumper. But this lack of depth in the characterization is not important; indeed, it would probably have been a mistake, for the point of the movie is that these are real animals - any animals - living in a real forest.
The character of Bambi himself fits in with this scheme. In his early youth he has a full measure of all the charm that a young mammal can display, with his spindly legs and his wide-eyed innocence. His voice, supplied by Bobby Stewart, is childishly cute; as he grows older his voice becomes progressively more mature, being supplied in these later stages of the movie by...
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By Ben Fritz

January 14, 2013, 12:45 p.m.

Following weak box office performances for re-releases of "Monsters, Inc.," "Finding Nemo" and "Beauty and the Beast" in 3-D, Walt Disney Studios has canceled plans for a 3-D "The Little Mermaid" in September.

The underwater animated hit from 1989 was the fourth and final 3-D re-release for which Disney announced plans in late 2011 after "The Lion King" proved a surprise hit in the format, grossing nearly $100 million in the U.S. and Canada.

But "The Lion King" turned out to be an anomaly, as the three follow-ups grossed far less. "Beauty and the Beast" took in $47.6 million last January, "Finding Nemo" $40.7 million in September, and "Monsters, Inc." only $30.5 million since its Dec. 19 release.

Though 3-D conversions cost only a few million dollars each, those weak box office performances are not enough for Disney to justify the marketing expense of a nationwide release.
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Dreams Around The Globe Will Once Again Take Flight!

Celebrate the 60th Anniversary of Disney’s Classic Adventure
As It Soars to New Heights for the First Time on Disney Blu-ray™

Available For Purchase on February 5, 2013

New Digital Restoration and Unparalleled High Definition Picture and Sound!

BURBANK, California, November 16, 2012 –– On February 5, 2013, The Walt Disney Studios celebrates the 60th Anniversary release of Walt Disney’s classic, “Peter Pan,” as it soars to all-new heights
– with a new digital restoration and high definition picture and sound - for the first time on Blu-ray™. The classic tale that taught us all “to believe” and first introduced us to the Darling children – Wendy, John and Michael - as they flew with Peter Pan and Tinker Bell past the second star to the right and straight on ‘till morning to the enchanted world of Never Land. Rediscover the magical adventure and relive childhood memories of this great bedtime story.
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Anastasia Tremaine and Drizella Tremaine from "Cinderella" (1950)
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Anastasia Tremaine and Drizella Tremaine from "Cinderella" (1950)

Anastasia Tremaine and Drizella Tremaine are the epitome of spoilt chrildren - the worst type of spoilt chrildren, in fact: those who stay that way right through into adulthood. Their voices are raucous and grating; their singing is dire; their faces are milk-curdling; their dancing is a little short of terrifying... but all of these things might be forgiven them, and they might succeed in finding their own Prince Charmings, were it not for the fact that their innate selfishness shines through in their every word and deed. In fact, they could be as beautiful as Cinderella and yet still be repellent for exactly this reason: a marvellous part of the Disney characterization of them is that they are not physically too revoltingly ugly.
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King from Cinderella: From the beginning he is trying to force his son to get married because he wants grandchildren. Then he has a temper tantrum and tries to kill the Grand Duke because Cinderella got away.

Seven Dwarves: Compared to the other characters on the list their crime is probably relatively minor. They allow Snow White to stay with them, but she has to do all of the cooking and cleaning for all 8 of them (the dwarves and herself). This begs the question: if she hadn’t done that, would they have sent this girl out on her own, even though sources say she was only supposed to be 14 years old?

Everyone from Sleeping Beauty except Aurora and Philip: First their parents set them up to be engaged basically as soon as Aurora is born. Then the fairies lie to her about who she is for 16 years. They lucked out that the guy she fell for in the forest turned out to be the same guy she was engaged to, but what if he wasn’t? They still would have forced her to marry him.
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Prince Charming
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Prince Charming from "Cinderella" (1950)

By contrast with Cinderella, Prince Charming is a rather anonymous character - much like the Prince in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, for example. His role is purely to be a handsome and high-born spouse, marriage to whom will raise Cinderella from her life of unjust drudgery. Even his insistence that he will marry no other than the beautiful girl with whom he danced at the ball is rendered to us at second hand, in a hilarious interview between the King and the Grand Duke. It was not until much later, in 1959's Sleping Beauty, that Disney was able to bring us a handsome fairy-tale prince capable of being more than a symbol.
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The Fairy Godmother
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of The Fairy Godmother from "Cinderella" (1950)

The absentminded Fairy Godmother - she even mislays her magic wand from time to time - was not universally approved: some critics found her too saccharine. Thomas A. Nelson, who has written one of the best overall critiques of the movie and its characters, remarks that her "jovial and absent-minded good nature comes off as a bit too sticky, that extra helping of the cute and charming which irratates rather than entertains". Most audiences found her dumpy good humour and eccentricity great fun - she would have been far less effective had she been cast as a fairy like Pinocchio's pristine and ethereally beautiful Blue Fairy for example.
With her hooded cloak, her dimpled face and her shock of white hair, the Fairy Godmother is everybody's idea of their favorite grandmother, and her absentmindedness adds to this impression - as does her voice, brilliantly supplied by Verna Felton, whose only earlier work for Disney had been one...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The beautiful Cinderella.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Cinderella from "Cinderella" (1950)

The character of Cinderella was posed in live action by Helene Stanley who, to jugde by stills of her performance, was even more beautiful than the screen Cinderella - although she was brunette rather than blonde. In a 1982 interview with Kur Wiley, Marc Davis, largely responsible for animating Cinderella, compared the character with another of his "creations", Cruella De Vil:

"I think that Cinderella would have to be the more difficult because she has to be the substance that carries the story all the way through. She has to be believable, she has to be real, and she has to be [someone] that you can feel sympathy for. Storytelling characters like these are rather thankless characters to do because... they don't get laughs! When you do something in animation and the whole audience laughs at one time at something you've done, it is a tremendous thrill."
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Sleeping Beauty - The beautiful Princess Aurora
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Although she is the central character of the movie, the part of Princess Aurora/Briar Rose is in fact a very small one - smaller, for example, than that of Prince Phillip (in marked contrast with Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs whose Prince hardly made an appearance, but whose heroine occupied a fair deal of screen-time). In fact, her functions in the movie are three: (a) to be cursed; (b) to meet and fall in love with Phillip; and (c) to prick her finger and fall into a death-like sleep. Over (a) and (c) she has no control whatsoever, and over (b) her control is as limited as that of anyone falling in love. Yet these three elements constitute the vital catalyst without which none of the rest of the action in the movie could occur.
Largely animated by Marc Davis, the doyen of Disney animators of women (he was responsible also for Cinderella and Cruella De Vil), Aurora is physically and temperamentally much more mature than Snow White; she is less cute, much more pretty. However, like Snow White she has a special affinity with the...
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“Cinderella has never looked more beautiful” - Leonard Matlin, Reelz Channel

Bibbidi Bobbidi Blu!

Disney Transforms Its Classic Fairytale To All-New Blu-ray™ Heights for Its Royal Diamond Edition Debut, October 2, 2012!

BURBANK, California, April 27, 2012 –– “A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes,” and at the stroke of midnight, October 2, 2012,
dreams around the globe really will come true when The Walt Disney Studios opens its prestigious vault to release one of Walt Disney’s most timeless and beloved masterpieces of all time, “Cinderella,” in the highly anticipated Blu-ray™ Diamond Edition Collection.

This enchanting classic comes alive in stunning fashion for in-home viewing for the very first time on Blu-ray high definition with enhanced picture and sound, once again being embraced by new and old generation alike and only available … as long as the spell lasts.

The “Cinderella: Diamond Edition,” with its spellbinding storyline, memorable music, unforgettable characters and spectacular animation, sparkles like never before with a wide-array of bonus features that extend the viewing...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Prince Eric
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

It is a recurring theme of this book that Disney's glamorous princes tend on the whole to be cyphers, and Eric (voiced by Christopher Daniel Barnes, then the US national teenage spokesperson for the enviromental organization Greenpeace) is no exeption. The habit of using purely symbolic characters in the princely role is not normally a particularly noticeable one in the other features; it is only later that we realize that, whereas we have the feeling we've met the other principal characters, the one in the role of the prince has never been more than a sort of blur to us. In the case of The Little Mermaid, however, probably because Ariel was so much designed to be the movie's dominant character, the fact that Eric dosen't have much going for him, except his rock-jawed good looks, becomes particuarly obvious. Oddly, though, a better excuse can be made for The Little Mermaid requiring a cypherlike prince than for most of the other Disney features: just as Triton is (in part) a symbol of paternal authority and possessiveness and...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The wonderful character Sebastian
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

With the exeption of Ariel - and possibly not even with that exception - the star of the whole show is Sebastian, or (to be fittingly pedantic) Horatio Thelonious Ignacious Crustaceous Sebastian, the little crab who is Triton's Court Composer and then Ariel's reluctantly conscripted Jiminy Cricket. The animation of Sebastian is a delight, and that surrounding him during the performace of his two brilliant songs - the calypso/reggae "Under the Sea" and the smoothly crooned "Kiss the Girl" - is devastatingly good, but the foundation of the character and the reason for its overwhelming succes in the film is undoubtedly the outstanding vocal performance turned in by the actor Samuel E. Wright. Originally it had been planned that Sebastian be English, but the movie's songwriters, Howard Ashman and Alan Menken, were looking for something a bit more upbeat, and foot-tapping from the music and so it was decided to give Sebastian's two numbers West Indian rhythms; from there to the adoption of a West Indian Sebastian was of course a very short step.
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Tough, crass and jaded, Ursula is trying to find a way to get back from King Triton the power that once was hers.
While the animation department was busily trying to complete Oliver & Company by the imminent deadline, Ron Clements and John Musker, the two directors of The Great Mouse Detective were working on an adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen's beloved story "The Little Mermaid." There had been astounding growth in every branch of the department from computer-generated images to the finest character animation. There was also a villain in this new picture that would take her place alongside the greatest villains the studio had ever created. In the polls that showed Cruella De Vil as the most popular villainess of all our pictures, Ursula came in a close second.
Ursula had an unusual visual advantage over the most other villains; she was an octopus. A creature of the sea, swimming, floating, moving in a sensuous fashion, ideal for an ominous, hypnotic type of schemer. When supervising animator Ruben Aquino started work on this character, he found that the extensive story sketches concentrated more on facial expressions than actions. Ruben said, "Actually it was Roy [Disney] who pushed for us to get more of that octopus feeling."
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Disney’s Most-Requested Animated Treasure
Finally Comes Out Of The Vault -- October 3, 2006!

Walt Disney Home Entertainment Proudly Announces
The Long-Awaited Two-Disc Special Edition DVD Debut of
The Little Mermaid

Huge Company-Wide Initiative Highlighted by
Disney Consumer Products Partnership To Take Retail UNDER THE SEA
With Over 2,000 New Licensed Merchandise Products

BURBANK, Calif., February 6, 2006 – On October 3, 2006 Walt Disney Home Entertainment proudly opens the vault to debut a spectacular new two-disc Special Edition of the most-requested Disney DVD title ever, the Academy Award® winning (1989 Best Song and Best Original Score), THE LITTLE MERMAID. The first time ever on a two-disc DVD, the eighth addition to Disney’s acclaimed “Platinum Collection,” this highly-anticipated release is accompanied by an expansive Walt Disney Company-wide celebration, including a huge continuing partnership with Disney Consumer Products (DCP) that builds on the overwhelming popularity and success of 2005’s Cinderella Home Entertainment and Consumer Products campaign. That...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of The Prince from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937)

If Snow White is, as it were, a "strong cypher", the Prince is a weak one. For an important central character he appears on the screen for an astonishingly short period of time - once early on when singing "One Song" with Snow White and the other time right at the end when his kiss wakes her from her otherwise endless sleep. Strangely enough, although he has only a few lines, his voice part proved the most difficult in the film to cast aside from that of Snow White, and indeed it was the last one to be finalized, the part eventually going to the established actor Harry Stockwell. The problem was that of finding a voice that captured the Prince's screen image as a robust, handsome young man (he had originally been envisaged as a Douglas Fairbanks type). In the event Stockwell achieved this to perfection.
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Walt Disney's "The Little Mermaid"
On the heels of the phenomenal success of The Lion King 3D—which will cross the $80 million mark at the domestic box office today—The Walt Disney Studios has announced limited theatrical engagements for four of its classic films for the first time in 3D. The following titles from Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios will be released in 2012 and 2013:

Beauty and the Beast – January 13, 2012

Pixar’s Finding Nemo – September 14, 2012

Pixar’s Monsters, Inc. – January 18, 2013
(Monsters University, a prequel to the original film, arrives in theaters in Disney Digital 3D on June 21, 2013)

The Little Mermaid – September 13, 2013



“Great stories and great characters are timeless, and at Disney we’re fortunate to have a treasure trove of both,” Alan Bergman, president, The Walt Disney Studios, says. “We’re thrilled to give audiences of all ages the chance to experience these beloved tales in an exciting new way with 3D—and in the case of younger generations, for the first time on the big screen.”
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Opinion by Lisia posted over a year ago
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A new Boutique


Have you ever think about the look of a shop and about the world that can rotate around a specific theme? What about an "Alice and Wonderland" theme?


Can the Belle Epoche artist Mucha be the representative of the magic and harmony of a dream world? His women are suspended between deception and imagination. The atmosphere also is like if was lacks of space and time.

What do you think?
Would you like a boutique inspired by madness and fantasy?
Which one of these images make you think about a strange and fantasy world?
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Article by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Walt Disney's "The Lion King"
With the stunning success of "The Lion King" this weekend, Disney might re-release other classics in 3D, its distribution chief told TheWrap Sunday.

"It's probably one of the first things we're going to be having a conversation about next week," studio distribution chief Dave Hollis said. "When you look at our library, there are some very special gems as it were, and for those that transcend time -- and a lot of them do ... to bring them through 3D is a great opportunity."

He stressed that there are no plans yet. But, he said, "The Lion King" success "gives a lot of hope to the possibilities that exist with all of our library."

Other studios have similar ideas.

"No question about it," Jeff Goldstein, executive VP of domestic distribution at Warner Bros., told TheWrap. "But we've talked about it before. It's not as if we're just thinking about it right now."

He acknowledged, however, that "The Lion King's" unexpectedly strong results will make the examination a little more serious.
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Article by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Walt Disney's "The Lion King"
Seventeen years after its first release, “The Lion King” is again No. 1 at the box office, wildly exceeding pre-release projections by pulling in an estimated $29.3 million.

A 3D re-release propelled the G-rated animated feature far beyond its expected $15 million take and well past the weekend’s three debuts -- all of which had disappointing starts.

The No. 2 movie of the weekend was a holdover from last week. The Warner Bros. PG-13 “Contagion" grossed a surprisingly strong $14.5 million -- almost $2 million more than expected.

FilmDistrict's R-rated "Drive," which grossed an estimated $11 million -- at the low end of its $10-to-$15 million pre-release projection -- was the only new movie in the top three.

The debut for the Ryan Gosling film followed some of the best reviews of the year for any film (evidenced by a 93 percent Rotten Tomatoes score).

Almost shockingly, however, moviegoers had a very different response, giving it a C-minus grade when polled by movie customer-satisfaction grader Cinemascore.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Mighty King Triton.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of King Triton from "The Little Mermaid" (1989)

The character of Triton is in many ways rather nondescript, for the mer-king's role in both the plot and the emotional subtext of the movie is as a symbol - and, at that, a symbol of two different things. First, he is the symbol of constitutional authority, convention and staidness: he is the establishment against which Ariel is rebelling, the past which she wishes to leave behind. Second, he symbolizes parental authority; in this respect, the fact that he is a mighty king (and she a princess) is irrelevant. What is relevant is that he is her father: like most young women, she must go through the process of switching her allegiance (by which term we don't mean subservience) to a male outside the family. This process is frequently painful for both participants but is necessary, as we see exemplified close to the movie's end, when Triton and Ariel embrace just before her wedding to Eric: it is the first moment in which we see genuine love expressed between them, yet...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The beautiful Princess Jasmine
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Walt Disney Character Description of Princess Jasmine from "Aladdin" (1992)

Mark Henn, who created the look of Jasmine for the movie, had various inspirations. One was a theme-park guest at Disney World in Florida, whose long thick mane of black hair sparked off an idea. The most important, however, was his sister Beth - although an actress called Robina Ritchie did live-action modeling to help the animation. Linda Larkin, who gave Jasmine her speaking voice, and Lea Salonga, who sang for her, looks not in the slightest like the screen version of Jasmine.
Continuing their practice in several previous movies, the Disney creators made Jasmine an independent-minded young woman; she is not going to be married off to any old lout, no matter how blue his blood, but is instead determined to marry for love. She is, moverover, impatient with her father's dictum that she should be confined within the palace (much of this movie's theme concerns confinement) and eventually escapes to discover what the outer world is like. There her...
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Review by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Roger Ebert: **** (4 Stars)

When I first heard about the project, I wondered if ``The Hunchback of Notre Dame'' could possibly work as a Disney animated feature--if the fearsomefeatures and fate of its sad hero Quasimodo would hold audiences at arm'slength. When I saw the preview trailers for the film, with its songs about``Quasi,'' I feared Disney had gone too far in an attempt to popularize andneutralize the material. I was wrong to doubt, and wrong to fear: ``TheHunchback of Notre Dame'' is the best Disney animated feature since ``Beauty andthe Beast''--a whirling, uplifting, thrilling story with a heart-touchingmessage that emerges from the comedy and song.

The story involves the lonely life of the deformed Quasimodo (voice byTom Hulce), born a ``monster'' and thrown down a well before being rescued andleft to be raised by the priests of Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. The vastgloomy gothic shadows of the cathedral become his playground, and his onlyfriends are three stone gargoyles. But his life changes on the day of theFestival of Fools, when he ventures out of the cathedral, is elected ``King ofthe Fools,'' and then hears Clopin, king of the gypsies,...
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Review by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Roger Ebert: **** (4 Stars)

Was there ever a scarier, more exciting animated feature than "Pinocchio"? I doubt it - at least not if you were between the ages of 5 and 10 when you saw it, and could identify with its blockheaded little hero. Pinocchio, who is not the brightest char acter in the history of cartoons, wants only to be a good little boy, but he's trapped by scoundrels who want to use him as a sideshow attraction, and then he's kidnapped and sent to an island where he will be turned into a donkey and put to work in the salt mines all day long.

I remember seeing "Pinocchio" for the first time when I was just about the right age, and identifying with every single moment of the movie. Seeing it again the other day, for the third or fourth time, I was struck again by what a great animated film it is. Many people choose "Snow White" as their favorite feature cartoon from Disney's golden age. My choice is "Pinocchio." The movie, made in 1940 and carefully restored for the 1992 rerelease, comes from the era of full animation, before Disney and all the other animators started cutting corners. New films like "The Little Mermaid" and "Beauty and the Beast"...
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Review by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Roger Ebert's Review of Walt Disney's "Hercules" (1997)
Roger Ebert: ***½ (3 and a half Stars)

The wonder is that it took Disney so long to get to the gods of Greek mythology. ``Hercules'' jumps into the ancient legends feet-first, cheerfully tossing out what won't fit and combining what's left into a new look and a lighthearted style.

Starting with a Day-Glo Olympian city in the clouds, and using characters based on the drawing style of the British illustrator Gerald Scarfe, this new animated feature has something old (mythology), something new (a Pegasus equipped with helicopter blades), something borrowed (a gospel singing group) and something blue (the flaming hair of Hades, which turns red when he gets mad--it works like a mood ring).

Hercules, known as Herc, is a rather different character here than in the pages of ``Bullfinch's Mythology.'' There, you may recall, he murdered his wife and children. Here he's a big cute hunk who's so clumsy he knocks over temples by accident, but you gotta love the guy. In fact, as film critic Jack Mathews has pointed out, the Disney storytellers have merged the Hercules of myth with the modern-day superhero, Superman: In both ``Hercules'' and the Superman...
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Review by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Roger Ebert's Review of Walt Disney's "The Lion King" (1994)
Roger Ebert: ***½ (3 and a half Stars)

My generation grew up mourning the death of Bambi's mother. Now comes "The Lion King," with the death of Mufasa, the father of the lion cub who will someday be king. The Disney animators know that cute little cartoon characters are not sufficient to manufacture dreams. There have to be dark corners, frightening moments, and ancient archetypes like the crime of regicide. "The Lion King," which is a superbly drawn animated feature, is surprisingly solemn in its subject matter, and may even be too intense for very young children.

The film is the latest in a series of annual media events from Disney, which with "The Little Mermaid," "Beauty and the Beast" and "Aladdin" reinvented its franchise of animated feature films. The inspiration for these recent films comes from the earliest feature cartoons created by Walt Disney himself, who in movies like "Dumbo," with the chaining of Mrs. Jumbo, and "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," with its wicked stepmother, tapped into primal fears and desires. Later Disney films drifted off into the neverland of innocuous "children's movies," which were harmless but not very exciting....
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Review by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Roger Ebert's Review of "Aladdin" (1992)
Roger Ebert: *** (3 Stars)

Robin Williams and animation were born for one another, and in "Aladdin" they finally meet. Williams' speed of comic invention has always been too fast for flesh and blood; the way he flashes in and out of characters can be dizzying. In Disney's new animated film "Aladdin," he's liberated at last, playing a genie who has complete freedom over his form - who can instantly be anybody or anything.

The genie is the best thing in the movie, which is good fun but not on a par with "The Little Mermaid" and "Beauty and the Beast," the two films with which Disney essentially gave rebirth to featurelength animation. The weakness of the film is in its leads, a street urchin named Aladdin and a sultan's daughter, Jasmine. As a romantic couple, they're pale and routine, especially compared to the chemistry between beast and the beauty. They look unformed, as if even the filmmakers didn't see them as real individuals.

All of the film's best moments come from the genie and the other supporting characters, which include a plump little sultan, his scheming vizier, an angry parrot named Iago, a chattering monkey, a friendly flying...
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Review by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Roger Ebert's Review of "The Little Mermaid" (1989)
Roger Ebert: **** (4 Stars)

Walt Disney's "The Little Mermaid" is a jolly and inventive animated fantasy - a movie that's so creative and so much fun it deserves comparison with the best Disney work of the past.

It's based on the Hans Christian Andersen tale about a mermaid who falls in love with a prince, but the Disney animators have added a gallery of new supporting characters, including an octopus named Ursula who is their most satisfying villainess since the witch in "Snow White."

Watching "The Little Mermaid," I began to feel that the magic of animation had been restored to us. After the early years of Walt Disney's pathfinding feature-length cartoons, we entered into a long, dark age in which frame-by-frame animation was too expensive, and even the great Disney animation team began using shortcuts. Now computers have taken the busywork out of the high-priced hands of humans, who are free to realize even the most elaborate flights of imagination. And that's certainly what they do in this film.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Max, Prince Eric's good-natured old dog.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Max from "The Little Mermaid" (1989)

Max is Eric's big, shaggy, ebullient, flobby-eared Old English Sheepdog; as a member of that species he obviously bears quite a strong physical resemblance to the Colonel in One Hundred and One Dalmatians, but Max has no pretensions to military competence: he is everybody's fun-loving, bouncy darling.
Well, not everybody's. He alone of the land-based characters immediately recognizes Vanessa as a wrong'un, and snarls at her as ferociously as his roly-poly appearance will permit. Naturally - having adored Ariel on sight - he joins in soon afterwards with the efforts of the marine animals to disrupt the marriage ceremony.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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AUDIENCES TO EXPERIENCE
DISNEY’S “THE LION KING” LIKE NEVER BEFORE…

TWO FIRSTS FOR OSCAR®- AND GOLDEN GLOBE®-WINNING ANIMATED CLASSIC:

September 16, 2011—All-New 3D Version of the “The Lion King” Hits Theaters for the First Time Ever

October 4, 2011— Available on Disney Blu-ray™ Hi-Def and Blu-ray 3D™ for the First Time Ever

BURBANK, Calif. (May 26, 2011) — Simba, Mufasa, Nala, Timon and Pumbaa are back and better than ever this fall when Disney’s “The Lion King” roars into theaters and homes in breathtaking 3D.
A special two-week theatrical extravaganza kicks off Sept. 16, 2011, showcasing the Oscar®- and Golden Globe®-winning film on the big screen in Disney Digital 3D™ for the first time ever, and its highly anticipated home entertainment debut kicks off October 4, celebrating the Diamond Edition release of the epic movie “The Lion King” in high-definition Blu-ray™ and Blu-ray 3D™.

“‘The Lion King’ is the best-selling home entertainment release of all time—and this is ‘The Lion King’ like never before,” said Bob Chapek, president of distribution,...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Ariel, the little mermaid
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Princess Ariel from "The Little Mermaid" (1989)

Tawny-haired Ariel was one of the most immediately popular animated heroines to emerge from the Disney stable for a very long time - indeed, it's hard to remember any at all that might match her in this respect. It is easy enough to explain away this phenomenal success in terms of sexual allure, of which she has plenty, yet that doesn't really get to the heart of the matter, for in many ways she is also a very childlike character.
Ariel is a girl who is in the process of becoming a sexually attractive woman; thus our responses to her, while linked to her sexuality, are nostalgic rather than prurient. This is particularly evident in the scenes when Ariel has just come ashore in human form and has discovered that she's got legs. Despite the obvious sexual overtones in the fact that she is now biifurcate, where she really appeals to us is in her wonder at finding these marvellous new appendages joined onto her. We're already smiling in resonance with...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Prince Phillip and his horse Samson
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Prince Phillip and Samson from "Sleeping Beauty" (1959)

The handsome Prince in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was nothing more than a cipher - it was not thought necessary even to name him. Prince Charming in Cinderella was more than just a plot device, but nevertheless still had only a minor part. For the third in their trio of great fairy stories, however, Disney gave the handsome Prince a far meatier role, and consequently his character had to be portrayed in more detail.
Phillip is gentle, good-natured, well spoken, courteous, romantic and above all courageous - just as you would expect him to be - but what is interesting is that these characteristics are all well blended together to create a convincing, fully rounded personality. When he fights his way through the forest of thorns or battles the Dragon, this behaviour is perfectly consonant with the gentleness he displayed towards Aurora as well as with his determination of mind when he tells his father that he is going to marry...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Snow White
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Snow White from "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937)

Snow White in the Disney version is, strangely, not in fact very beautiful - although extremely attractive. Presumably deliberately, Disney opted for girl-next-door prettiness rather than out-and-out beauty. Moreover, Snow White appears to be extremely youthful, aged perhaps between 12 and 14 (although modelled by 18-year-old Marjorie Belcher), and still with a trace of early adolescent plumpness. However, framed by her dark, shortish hair, her face has an infinitely appealing innocent charm and sweetness.
Snow White's voice reinforces this impression of youth. This voice was supplied by Adriana Caselotti, the daughter of a Hollywood singing teacher. Interestingly, among the many hundreds of young women who were auditioned for the part was Donna Durbin; she was turned down on the grounds that her voice was too mature, too well honed. What is startling is that the Snow White we see and hear is in fact an older version of the original character...
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Opinion by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Flotsam and Jetsam from "The Little Mermaid" (1989)

Ursula's two hench-eels are certainly villainous-looking creatures: seen head-on they resemble not so much eels as gnarled old alligators, with their skewed eyes, crumpled-looking jaws and haphazard teeth. Their eyes glow luminously in the dark - indeed, they do more than that, for Ursula, gazing into a large air bubble that looks astonishingly like a crystal ball, is able to look through those eyes in order to spy on distant events. (This business of scrying - farseeing - has become very popular in recent Disney animated features: it plays an important part in the plot of Beauty and the Beast as well)
The two eels (indistinguishable except for their eye colors) play a significant part in one of the movie's most effective minor pieces of animation. As Ursula is building up in the first few lines of her song "Poor Unfortunate Souls" they swim sinuously around her, reflecting the curves of her ample body, seeming to trail like the long scarves...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of The Blue Fairy from "Pinocchio" (1940)

The Force of good might seem to be underrepresented in the movie when compared with the force of evil, incarnate in John Worthington Foulfellow, The Coachman, Stromboli, Lampwick... On the side of good are only Gepetto (a fairly passive ally), Jiminy Cricket, the Blue Fairy and eventually towards the end, the late-discovered integrity of Pinocchio himself. Yet good, of course, eventually triumphs (although, as noted, it does not destroy the evil).
The Blue Fairy is a blonde of pristine beauty; she is so realistically depicted that it seems almost as if one were watching some kind of special-effects treatment of a live actress rather than an animation. Her voice enhances her purity of image: it was supplied by Evelyn Venable, a movie actress from Cincinnati, and was recorded in a unusual way. She spoke each of her lines several times over, using different inflections, and then the soundmen dubbed in the version they thought worked most effectively, in the context...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Tarzan from "The Black Cauldron" (1985)

Taran, the Assistant Pig-Keeper who wants to make good by becoming a great warrior, is a member of that great fraternity of Disney central protagonists who are rather indefinitely characterized. To say that they are nonentities - as some critics have done - is to be a little harsh, because they are not; but they are definitely, and quite deliberately, painted in pastel colours so that the more ostentatiously bizarre characters around them may shine. The "new breed" of Disney animators saw fit to make Taran an amalgam between the (approximate) appearance of Wart and the personality of Mowgli. This was probably a wise decision, since, The Black Cauldron is, debatably, overloaded with strong principal characters, and so a powerfully portrayed Taran would simply have eclipsed such delightful creations as Fflewddur Fflam, Gurgi and Doli.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Ursula from "The Little Mermaid" (1989)

The Emmy-winning Pat Carroll, who voiced the part of the sea-witch (spelt with a b), is a very experienced actress on both stage and screen. Carroll envisioned the role as "part Shakespearean actress, with all the flair, flamboyance and theatricality, and part used-car salesman with a touch of con artist". She deliberately deepend her own voice, especially for the singing (she's naturally a contralto); in an interview with Lou Cedrone she added: "I'm not really a singer, and I would rather have talked-sang the role, but they wanted me to sing it, so I did... The producers sharpened and heightened all of it, particularly the singing." The first stanza or so of "Poor Unfortunate Souls", before she hits her triumphant stride, shows the necessity of this.
Ursula is a marvellous villainess, one of the Disney classics of her malicious genre. She has the gross oleaginous unsubtlety of The Great Mouse Detective's villain Ratigan but substantially more...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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Belle as she appears in the beginning of the movie.
The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Belle from "Beauty and the Beast" (1991)

It was decided early that the movie's heroine should display a lot more spirit than the somewhat passive virtue of the character in the original fairy tale. The liveaction performance for the animators' reference was supplied by Sherri Stoner, the actress who had not long before served the same funtion so very excellently for The Little Mermaid's Ariel, another feisty female part. Belle's part was spoken and sung by Paige O'Hara, a talented and strong actress who could be relied upon to give the role both depth and variety: she was able to provide the right lightness of touch for the comic scenes and the dramatic strenth required for the serious ones. Belle was also given a very prominent role in terms of appearance time: she is on screen for just under half an hour, which is twice as long as any of the other characters. Her animators, under the supervision of the young Jasmes Baxter (who used an early sketch by xstoryman Roger Allers as a main reference), let...
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Maid Marian from "Robin Hood" (1973)

Maid Marian, niece to King Richard, plays a very small role in the movie, and after she and Robin have plighted their troth she seems to be largely forgotten about. Her function is essentially to provide a motive for Robin to attend the archery tournament and thereby set things up for one of the movie's major sequences. What is intriguing, however, is that the animators have succeded in making a vixen have the screen presence of an attractive woman. In part this must be due to her voice, supplied by Monica Evans, but this cannot be a total explanation. One must simply applaud the skill of the Disney animators.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Simba from "The Lion King" (1994)

The story of Simba is the story of the movie: Born to kingship, he is tricked into abandoning it and then deliberately turns his back on it until persuaded by others to assume his responsibilities. Stripped down like that, the story seems a very simple one, but that is not the real story. The real story is of the transformation of Simba's character through several pronouncedly different stages.
As a baby and then a cub he is what Bill Cotter has described as "warm and fuzzy" - what used to be a typical Disney animal, in fact. As a cub he is as cocksure as the average preteen, and as gullible. It could not be made more patent that "Uncle Scar" is a stinker from root to branch, yet the young Simba swallows everything he says. The characterization is such as to evoke great sympathy - we have all been through that stage ourselves.
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Guide by PrueFever posted over a year ago
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The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules by
John Grant

Character Description of Ronno from "Bambi" (1945)


The part of Ronno, the buck whom Bambi fights over Faline, is small yet quite vivid, all the more so as the animators adopted a semi-abstract treatment for large sections of the fight. The striking thing about Ronno is that he is much more solid than Bambi: darker in colour and heavier of build, he seems to be definitely heavier and definitely older than our hero. Clearly it was important to portray him in this way, for thereby Disney ensured that our sympathies are doubly engaged on Bambi's side - he is the underdog, triumphing even although the odds are stacked against him.
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“A film you will never forget” - The New York Times

First Time in High Definition -- As A 2-Disc Blu-ray™ Combo Pack, DVD and Movie Download

Disney’s
Dumbo
70th Anniversary Edition

The Beloved Academy Award®-Winning Animated Classic
Releases September 20, 2011



BURBANK, Calif., April 29, 2011 — Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment invites audiences to let their spirits soar with the release of the beloved animated classic Dumbo, for the first time ever in high definition as a 70th Anniversary Edition, coming on September 20, 2011.
The Academy Award®-winning (1942, Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture) favorite will take flight for the first time with a premium restoration in stunning Blu-ray™ highdefinition featuring pristine 7.1 Digital Theater System High-Def Surround Sound, allowing fans to see more, hear more, interact more and share more of this timeless adventure about believing in yourself.
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The Little Mermaid Early Original Script


It is a bright, sunny morning. Scuttle is excitedly flying toward the palace.


INT. ARIEL'S BEDROOM


Ariel is asleep in her bed with a happy smile on her face. She is dreaming of romance with Eric. Sebastian is also asleep, on the stand beside the bed, SNORING loudly. Scuttle swoops through the window and enters the bedroom.


SCUTTLE
(shouting)
Ariel! WAKE UP!!!


Sebastian wakes up with a jolt in reaction to Scuttle's screaming. Scuttle flies over to Ariel and frantically pulls at her clothes and her hair. She wakes up groggily.


SCUTTLE (cont.)
I just heard the news!
Congratulations, kiddo! We did it!


Ariel stares at the seagull blankly.


SEBASTIAN
What is dis idiot babbling about?


SCUTTLE
(winking conspiratorily)
Right! As if you two didn't know!
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